Scenic Rail Melbourne

Submitted by john on Thu, 28/05/2020 - 16:09

This map of Scenic Rail Melbourne shows the limits of highly profitable transport, with stops typically within 2km. The network to comprise:
* 733km of two-way 10m high guide-rail on poles,
* 3 accessible stops/km, 100 fully automatic podcars/km,
* 5 vehicles waiting at all stops 24/7, with video surveillance,
* podcars to carry 5 people, a wheelchair, bikes or 400kg freight,

An aerial podcar system will greatly advance transport objectives in contrast to deterioration by all other options

Submitted by john on Tue, 17/12/2019 - 15:51

Alternatives that provide major structures in an arterial network are not acceptable for amenity because of visual blight and because of reduction of road capacity. Alternatives that do not attract sufficient mode change away from cars are not acceptable for amenity, despite the expedient current practice. Both these items should be fatal flaws. Alternatives that do not make a profit are not financially viable, such that standards that apply for businesses should also rule them out, despite our current approach for public transport.

Scenic Rail Victoria

Submitted by john on Sat, 13/06/2020 - 16:01

This is an extension of 733km of Scenic Rail Melbourne with 797km of Scenic Rail Victoria. Routes to Geelong, Sunbury and Melton may be profitable. Routes to Ballarat, Ocean Grove, Drysdale, Leopold, Torquay, Bendigo, Bacchus Marsh, Traralgon, and Whittlesea will require cross-subsidy. Routes to Shepparton and Albury require significant cross-subsidy. Route length is the main cost as operating costs can be recovered at current fare rates.

Convert traffic congestion on arterial streets to free flow using existing infrastructure, and get fast trips and low emissions

Submitted by john on Sun, 17/06/2018 - 19:08

Proper operation of arterial streets will produce a green wave, where a platoon of traffic flows through sequential sets of traffic signals at the speed limit with the minimum of wasted time, braking, acceleration, and emissions. The following steps are employed as necessary: